The mission of the Maui Association of Landscape Professionals (MALP) is to exemplify leadership by offering education to its membership, the industry, and the community.

Maui Class of 2015, Landscape Industry Certified Technicians

By Allison Wright

It’s an exciting time on Maui. For the second time in almost a decade, the Maui Association of Landscape Professionals sponsored certification testing in Ornamental Maintenance. In the short span of the year, this program has proven successful. I continually receive comments on the program and am asked when the next sessions are to start. This program in ornamental maintenance serves a reminder of the basic safety training all employees need in the field. It is also becoming a more common requirement in contract negotiations and job descriptions as Maui employers, community associations and contractors become aware of the existence of Landscape Industry Certified Technicians.

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Plants that make scents—Scentual Gardens

By T&T Nutt

In the daylight, colors, shapes and forms make a landscapes appearance enticing. Red foliage is easy to distinguish from that of yellow, and blue flowers stand out from green foliage. Shapes, textures, and various dimensions are easily recognizable. As day turns into night, the surrounding colors and shapes become shadows. This is when our eyesight may falter, but our nose and sense of smell prevails. Many flowers hide their fragrance in the heat of the day becoming most pungent from dusk to dawn, when nature reveals the sensation of its fragrance.

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Podocarpus gracilior: the Fern Pine

Article By Allison Wright

Podocarpus gracilior, the fern pine, is native to East Africa and grows in most climates in Hawaii with the exception of extreme elevations where the temperatures may drop below freezing. It thrives in full sun to part shade. If left alone, the tree will grow to 50 feet or more tall with a 25 to 30 foot spread. Be sure new plantings are well watered, but, once established, podocarpus is very drought tolerant. Do not allow it to sit in consistently wet soil as it will quickly show signs of over watering with wilting branches and leaf drop.

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The World of Bananas in Hawaii: Then and Now

Review by Olin Erickson

A few words of introduction cannot begin to describe the wealth of information found in this book. It begins with the amazing seafaring migrations of pacific islanders who brought banana varieties (mai’a in Hawaiian) with them. Over time the mai’a evolved into distinct Hawaiian varieties. There is an extensive discussion of the origins, habitat, propagation and uses of all distinct varieties complete with pictures plants legends and folklore. These Hawaiian Mai’a especially when cooked are known to be the tastiest bananas on earth. It is no wonder that Angela and Francis proclaim that their staple carbohydrate is the traditional Hawaiian bananas. They even provide the recipes they use for cooking and serving bananas.

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All About Palms

By Olin Erickson Certified Arborist and Past Malp Board President

All palms are classified into the scientific family Aracecea. Within that family of palms there are approximately 200 genera making up a total of over 2,600 different species or palm varieties. One type of genera consists of all the native Hawaiian palms, Pritchardia. There are approximately 29 species of Pritchardia palms endemic to Hawaii, known locally as Loulu palms. Every island has its own unique species that grows distinctly to its specific habitat. Maui has distinct species that are found only in certain areas on the island. Common Pritchardia’s of Maui include; P. arecina & P. forbesiana.

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Efficacy of Granular Preemergent Herbicide

From the Summer 2010 MALP Newsletter  By Norman Nagata  University of Hawaii Extension Agent,  University of Hawaii, Cooperative Extension Service —  This article “summarizes” a 6-month granular pre-emergent herbicide test that was conducted with Pendulum, Freehand, Ronstar, Barricade, Snapshot, Preen 9-17-9 with trifluralin, Amaze with benefin + oryzalin, and corn gluten to control garden spurge (Chamaesyce hirta), prostrate spurge (Chamaesyce prostrate), graceful spurge (Chamaesyce hypericifolia), emilia (Emilia sonchifolia), coat buttons (Tridax…

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How to Select a Tree

From the Summer 2007 MALP Newsletter By: Ernie Rezents ISA Certified Arborist, and ASCA Registered Consulting Arborist Last month Susi Mastroianni wrote “How to Plant a Tree“. This article will complement hers by discussing considerations you need to make when selecting a tree you want to plant. It is important to buy the right tree because trees are a big investment. There is the initial cost of buying the tree,…

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How to Plant a Tree

From the Spring 2007 MALP Newsletter by Susi Mastroianni Certified Arborist —  Like children, trees (and other plants) benefit from having the very best start we can give them. There are many points to consider when planting a tree if you wish to enjoy it for many years to come. Whether a fruit tree, shade tree, small ornamental or wind break, trees have many things in common. They need to be…

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Citrus Trees: From Oranges to Tangelos

By Ernie Rezents ISA Certified Arborist, and ASCA Registered Consulting Arborist

One of the most often planted citrus is the orange, Citrus sinensis. The most popular is the Washington navel orange. The origin of this fruit is Brazil. Apparently an orange tree mutated and bore fruit without seeds. Buds were grafted onto root stock plants and two were sent to Washington DC. From those two trees all Washington navel oranges were derived. Robertson navel orange is also an excellent fruit. Both of my matured trees are about 8 feet tall by 8 feet wide. They are heavy bearers of excellent fruit. Typically the fruit have a navel, or piko, on the distal end. Typically we peel and cut up the fruit into sections for morning fruit. You can also cut the fruit into sections to eat it right off the skin. Oranges also make good juice when squeezed, and provide lots of pulp.

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